Why is Trisodium Phosphate in Our Food?

(Originally posted on Mar 25, 2013)

Using the example of Banana Nut Cheerios, let’s just for a minute… forget that there are GM ingredients in this cereal,  and let’s also forget that it contains A LOT of sugar…check this out:

  • Sugar
  • Brown Sugar Syrup
  • Corn Syrup

…and if that wasn’t enough sugar, it also has

  • Dried Corn Syrup

(Yeah…“Heart Healthy Cereal” …wink- wink)

So besides all that sugar, could someone please explain to me why this cereal contains Trisodium Phosphate? And it’s not just limited to this cereal, it is in fact in many other cereals as well as other foods!

Per the Website In R Food, the following speaks about the potential health effects of Trisodium Phosphate:

“The FDA claims that Trisodium phosphate in certain amounts is not a risk in food, but some reports and agencies have deemed it a hazardous substance. The Clean Water Act has taken steps to limit the use of TSP in cleaning supplies because it damages the environment. Phosphates are required of the human body, however trisodium phosphate is an inorganic chemical phosphate. There are other organic sources of necessary phosphates that are proven to be safe and beneficial for consumption.

TSP has not been proven to be toxic to humans as a food additive, but has shown to be severely irritating to the gastric mucosa unless part of a buffered solution. Trisodium phosphate may reduce accumulation of lactic acid in muscles. Excess intake of TSP may produce an imbalance of minerals that lead to loss of calcium from bone and a calcification of the kidneys. The daily limit of trisodium phosphate is recommended to be 70mg. TSP consumed as part of a Western junk food diet sometimes reaches upwards of 500mg, which leads to an increased risk of developing osteoporosis.

 

So the FDA states that Trisodium Phosphate (TSP) is “Not a risk in food”, yet on the website PAN Pesticides Database – Chemicals it clearly states to “Avoid all Contact”!

You may be interested to know that TSP is also found in:

  • Processed meat products
  • Processed cheeses
  • Many canned soups
  • Acts as a leavening agent in many commercial cakes and baked goods

It is also found in:

  • Toothpaste
  • Whitening Toothpaste
  • Baby Toothpaste
  • Mouthwash
  • Hair coloring and bleaching agents

When you think of all the health problems in this country, and then you think of what the FDA allows in our food, it certainly isn’t a major leap to wonder if this is on purpose!

What do you think?

 

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