One Comment

  1. nmeunier@mailhaven.com' Norm
    Mar 16, 2015 @ 14:21:28

    Thank you for your article on L-Arginine and heart disease. I am one of those unfortunate souls that had a health care system that ignored my symptoms time and time again, suffered a heart attack back in 2011 at the age of 53. As is typical of patients who’ve had stents put in, I was put on a list of drugs, which I was willing to do for awhile, but began to question the wisdom of continuing this course of action. My doctor was more than happy to keep writing refill prescriptions.

    Within about 7 months, I took myself off of my statin drug which was virtually crippling me (severe knee pain, leg and foot cramps). Again, my G.P. couldn’t have cared less and never suggested another drug or lowering the dosage. So I stopped that cold-turkey.

    I then began to question my blood pressure medication because despite my healthy diet, it was difficult to regulate my blood pressure and keep it down. When it was down to “normal” levels I always felt like garbage. I was also having severe libido and ED issues which was never a problem in my life before. Once again, my G.P. was completely useless and his only “cure” was a prescription for Viagra. It was clear that stuff wasn’t going to help me, especially when you have absolutely no libido. So I did my own research and started using L-Arginine/L-Orthinine as well as many other supplements.

    I wasn’t long before I told my doctor to reduce my BP dosage from 5mg to 2.5mg. He was very reluctant to do this, but complied. I was asked to monitor my BP, and as expected, my results after a month were better than they had ever been solely on Ramipril.

    Recently, I started taking garlic capsules (equiv. to 3 cloves). Now my BP is generally around 115/75 with a much lower pulse rate than I’ve ever had in my entire life (in the 60’s)! No thanks to my doctor, I’m doing as best as can be expect and then some. I also have to deal with fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue so trying to go back to weight training or anything intense is now out of the question. (Even yoga was discouraged by one other doctor I went to.)

    I’m hoping to request my BP med be lowered even further in the coming months. My goal is to be done with Ramipril altogether. I wish I had read articles like yours many years before I went through the life-changing ordeal I had to endure.

    From what I’ve seen, the health care system is fine with trauma, but as almost useless when it comes to on-going or preventative care. Too much hinges on dollars and keeping them busy treating things that can easily be done safer, easier and cheaper through diet, exercise and supplements.

    My ED is getting better but not quite there yet. I’ve tried several supplements with only a modicum of success. (I’m trying out Maca and Pycnogenol along with L-Arginine which has some clinical trials to show its effective for this condition.) The real irony is that I never abused my body in any manner. Never smoked, avoided alcohol, but stress was sure a factor. I walked 30 minutes twice a day for two years prior to my heart attack. So, bad genetics were even a greater factor, as far as I can tell. Thanks again for your article.

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